Practical Case Studies for Engaging the Patient in the Diagnosis and Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation

Activity Details
  • Credit Amounts:
    • CME: 1.00
    • CNE: 1.00
  • Cost: Free
  • Release: May 16, 2017
  • Expires: May 16, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete:
    1 Hour(s)
  • Average User Rating:
    ( Ratings)

 

 

Needs Statement

All patients taking a pain medication containing an opioid are at risk for developing adverse effects, specifically opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Therefore all patients being considered for or currently on chronic opioid therapy should be assessed for OIC risk. Because OIC may present with a variety of nonspecific symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating and decreased bowel movement frequency, clinicians need to be proactive in identifying and managing OIC in all their patients on chronic opioid therapy.
 
This two-part CME/CNE-certified online publication provides real-world case examples that focus on increasing healthcare clinicians competence and performance in screening, diagnosing, treating, and managing, in partnership with the patient, OIC. Participants will learn about: tools to screen patients and talk to them about OIC; criteria and symptoms to better diagnose OIC; and OIC therapeutic options and individualizing patients’ management plans.

Target Audience

The target audience for this program is primary care clinicians, including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and nurses who are treating patients that are taking prescription opioids for chronic pain. Palliative care providers are also welcome to participate in this activity.

Objectives

After completing this activity, the participant will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Analyze current pharmacologic treatments for OIC, exploring their unique mechanisms of action in relation to the pathophysiology of OIC, and limitations of use with these products.
  2. Employ strategies for treating OIC refractory to conventional laxative treatment.

Accreditation

Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this enduring educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Continuing Nursing Education Provider Unit, Boston University School of Medicine is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.
CNE Contact Hours: 1.0 all of which are eligible for pharmacology credit.

Faculty Disclosure

Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities to disclose all relationships with commercial interests. This information is disclosed to CME activity participants. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to resolve any apparent conflicts of interest. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and devices is being discussed. 

H. Christian Weber, MD
Co-Course Director
Associate Chief and Clinical Director
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
VA Boston Healthcare System
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA
Dr. Weber has disclosed that he serves as a consultant for Allergan and Karos Pharmaceuticals. His spouse serves as a consultant for Neovil Pharmaceuticals AG. He does not plan on discussing unlabeled/investigational uses of a commercial product.
 
Jason M. Worcester, MD
Co-Course Director
Medical Director
Adult Primary Care
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA
Dr. Worcester has no relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest and does not plan on discussing unlabeled/investigational uses of a commercial product.
 
Patricia M. Bruckenthal, PhD, APRN-BC, ANP, FAAN
Associate Dean for Nursing Research and Innovation
Associate Professor
Stony Brook University School of Nursing            
Stony Brook, NY
Dr. Bruckenthal has disclosed that she serves as a consultant for Endo Pharmaceuticals, and as a speaker for AstraZeneca and Pernix Therapeutics. She does not plan on discussing unlabeled/investigational uses of a commercial product.
 
Accredited Provider Disclosures
Kristen Stakelin, MD: CME Course Reviewer for Boston University School of Medicine’s Office of Continuing Medical Education, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.
Siobhan Nevin, RN, BSN, CWOCN: CNE Course Advisor for Boston University School of Medicine’s Office of Continuing Medical Education, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.
Patti-Ann Collins, DNP, MSN/MBA, RN: Lead Nurse Planner for Boston University School of Medicine’s Office of Continuing Medical Education, has no relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest.
Christopher Drury, MA, MA: Medical Writer for Boston University School of Medicine’s Office of Continuing Medical Education, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.
Dana Frazier, CHCP: Program and Grant Manager for Boston University School of Medicine’s Office of Continuing Medical Education, has indicated no real or apparent conflicts.
 

Acknowledgment

This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP and Takeda Pharmaceuticals International, Inc., U.S. Region.