The ABCs of Anticoagulation and Reversal: Do You Know Your DOACs?

Activity Details
  • Credit Amounts:
    • CME: 1.00
    • CPE: 1.00
    • CNE: 1.00
    • Other: 1.00
  • Cost: Free
  • Release: Jun 23, 2017
  • Expires: Jun 22, 2018
  • Estimated Time to Complete:
    1 Hour(s)
  • System Requirements:
  • Average User Rating:
    (4 Ratings)

 

Faculty

Steven B.  Deitelzweig Steven B. Deitelzweig, MD, MMM, FACC, SFHM, FACP, RVT
Ochsner Health System
Medical Director of Regional Business
Development
System Chairman, Hospital Medicine
Associate Professor of Medicine –
Ochsner Clinical School
New Orleans, LA

David  Garcia David Garcia, MD
Associate Medical Director Anti-Thrombotic Therapy
University of Washington Medical Center
Professor of Medicine
Division of Hematology
University of Washington School of Medicine
Seattle, WA

Scott Kaatz Scott Kaatz, DO
Course Director
Division of Hospital Medicine
Medical Director of Professional Development and Research
Henry Ford Hospital
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

Needs Statement

With anticoagulation, bleeding complications are a common and significant concern with the use of currently-available anticoagulants. In recent years, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have emerged as an alternative to warfarin for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease. However, due to the targeted mechanism of action of Direct-Acting Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs), traditional reversal methods such as fresh frozen plasma (FFP) are not thought to significantly influence their reversal. Even with the addition of idarucizumab for dabigatran reversal, and 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) for warfarin reversal, there are still numerous questions regarding which patients should be reversed, what is the risk of a thromboembolic event, and how to use these agents, what clinical outcomes are required to assess their efficacy, and what is the optimal intravenous administration duration. The goal of this program is to provide comprehensive updates and strategies for the reversal of oral anticoagulants in order to deliver the best possible care.

 

Faculty Planning Committee
Scott Kaatz, DO                                                                          
Course Director                                                                           
Division of Hospital Medicine                                                        
Medical Director of Professional Development and Research              
Henry Ford Hospital                                                                    
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine 
Wayne State University
Detroit, MI

Elaine Hylek, MD
CME Course Director
Professor of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA 

Christina Fanola, MD
CME Course Co-Director
Cardiology Fellow
Boston Medical Center
Boston, MA

Diane Wirth, RN
Manager Manager Grady Heart Failure Program
Atlanta, GA

Patti-Ann Collins, DNP, MSN/MBA, RN
CNE Course Advisor/Lead Nurse Planner
Boston University School of Medicine CME/CNE
Boston, MA

 

Target Audience

This activity will be designed to inform cardiologists, specialists in internal medicine, hospitalists, surgeons, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses and pharmacists who manage patients undergoing treatment with anticoagulant therapies.

 

Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to (or better able to):

  • Recognize which patients are candidates for reversal and the potential thromboembolic consequences of discontinuing and reversing anticoagulation.
  • Discuss the evidence to reverse warfarin with Vitamin K, FFP and PCC.
  • Examine the role and clinical utility of reversal agents for various DOACs.
  • Explore other reversal agents that are currently in development.

To Receive Credit:
Please complete the pre-test and listen to the educational recording. Once you've completed the post test and evaluation form, your certificate will be available immediately on the BUSM CME website. 

 

Accreditation

Continuing Medical Education
Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

ANCC Accreditation
Continuing Nursing Education Provider Unit, Boston University School of Medicine is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

CNE Contact Hours: 1.00 (final pharmacology credits to be determined)

Continuing Pharmacy Education Credits
The University of Rhode Island, College of Pharmacy, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education (CPE). Completion of the learning activity and completion of online evaluations and self-assessment tools at the conclusion of the program are required to earn credit. This is a knowledge-based learning activity. This learning activity provides 1.0 contact hours (0.1 CEUs) of continuing pharmacy education credit.  UNIVERSAL ACTIVITY NUMBER: 0060-9999-17-013-H01-P.

 

 

 

Faculty Disclosure

Disclosure Policy:
Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of Continuing Medical Education (CME) Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) activities to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. This information is disclosed to activity participants prior to the start of the educational activity. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to resolve all conflicts of interest. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and devices are being discussed.  

Speakers:
Dr. Kaatz is on the speaker’s bureau for Janssen, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol Myer Squibb/Pfizer, CSL Behring, and Daiichi Sankyo. He is a consultant for Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol Myer Squibb/Pfizer, Janssen, Daiichi Sankyo, and Portola. He receives research funding (to institution) from Janssen. Dr. Kaatz is on the boards (non-profit) for Thrombosis and Hemostasis Societies of North America, AC Forum, National Certification Board of Anticoagulation Providers, and National Blood Clot Alliance Medical and Scientific Advisory Board.

Dr. Garcia is a consultant for Bristol-Myer Squibb, PFizer, Daiichi Sankyo, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bayer, Incyte and Alexion. He also receives research support from Janssen and Daiichi Sankyo.

Dr. Deitelzweig consultant for Forest Research Institute Inc.

Content Reviewers:
Dr. Hylek, CME Co-Course Advisor, is a consultant for Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb and Pfizer, Boehringer Ingelheim, Daiichi-Sankyo, and Johnson and Johnson. She also receives grant/research from Bristol Myers Squibb/Pfizer and Johnson and Johnson. She additionally has spoken at symposiums for Bayer, Boehringer Ingelheim and Bristol Myers Squibb/Pfizer.

Dr. Fanola, CME Co-Course Advisor and Ms. Patti-Ann Collins, Lead Nurse Planner, have no relevant financial disclosures

Ms. Wirth, CNE Course Advisor, is on the speaker’s bureau for Janssen and she is a consultant for Roche diagnostics.

Planning Committee Disclosures:
Elizabeth Drury, Dana Frazier, and Julie White, Ms. Elizabeth Goldstein planning committee members and Patti-Ann Collins, DNP, MSN/MBA, RN, CNE Course Advisor/Lead Nurse Planner have no relevant relationships to disclose. 

 

Acknowledgment

Commercial Support
This activity is supported by educational grants from Portola Pharmaceuticals, CSL Behring L.L.C., and Boehringer Ingelheim.

 

Disclaimer

THIS CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IS INTENDED SOLELY FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES FOR QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS. IN NO EVENT SHALL BOSTON UNIVERSITY BE LIABLE FOR ANY DECISION MADE OR ACTION TAKEN IN RELIANCE ON THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE PROGRAM. IN NO EVENT SHOULD THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THE PROGRAM BE USED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL CARE.  NO PHYSICIAN-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP IS BEING ESTABLISHED.