Accreditation Information

Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 15.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the activity, with individual assessments of the participant and feedback to the participant, enables the participant to earn 12 MOC points in the American Board of Pediatrics’ (ABP) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABP MOC credit.*

By attending this activity and providing your ABP number & Date of Birth, you authorize BUSM CME office to report your information to the ACCME so that we may process your MOC Part II credit on your behalf.

Application for CME credit has been filed with the American Academy of Family Physicians. Determination of credit is pending.

This continuing medical education activity has been reviewed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and is acceptable for a maximum of 15.50 AAP credits. These credits can be applied toward the AAP CME/CPD Award available to Fellows and Candidate Members of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Continuing Nursing Education Provider Unit, Boston University School of Medicine is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

This program is pending accreditation by the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) for 16 NAPNAP CE contact hours, of which 0 are pharmacology (Rx) content.

AAPA accepts certificates of participation for educational activities certified for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized  state medical society. Physician assistants may receive a maximum of 15.5 hours of Category I credit for completing this program.

* Please note, ABP does not allow partial MOC points.  Points may be earned as follows:  10 points for attending all sessions until the afternoon break on both Friday and Saturday.  1 additional point for each lunch session.

 

Needs Statement

Emotional and behavioral problems among children and adolescents continue to be highly prevalent and their significance for well-being is well documented but the vast majority of children…are still unidentified and untreated (Academic Pediatrics, Volume 10, Number 4, July – August 2010 252-259). In addition, children with special health care needs are a population that has received recent focus in attention and need as the medical home and accountable care are both designed to improve care for these complex children.

Early identification of developmental disorders is critical to the well-being of children and their families. It is an integral function of the primary care medical home and an appropriate responsibility of all pediatric health care professionals. Delayed or disordered development can be caused by specific medical conditions and may indicate an increased risk of other medical complications. Delayed or disordered development may also indicate an increased risk of behavior disorders or associated developmental disorders. Early identification should lead to further evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. Early intervention is available for a wide range of developmental disorders; their prompt identification can spur specific and appropriate therapeutic interventions. Identification of a developmental disorder and its underlying etiology may also affect a range of treatment planning, from medical treatment of the child to family planning for his or her parents. In order to identify a delay, pediatric clinicians need to be aware of what problems exist and how they manifest.

Of nearly 7.4 million children in the United States diagnosed with emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions, a disproportionate number do not get the mental health services they need because they are under insured, according to a new report released by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The study also finds that boys, adolescents, and children from low-income families are affected by conditions such as depression or Attention Deficit Disorder at higher rates than other children, but that adequate health services for these children remain an unmet need. In addition transition issues for these same children are of paramount importance and complexity.

The report, “The Mental and Emotional Well-Being of Children: A Portrait of States and the Nation 2007,” identified seven emotional, behavioral, or developmental conditions: depression, anxiety, Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, conduct disorders, autism spectrum disorders, developmental delay and Tourette Syndrome. Children with these conditions can benefit from a variety of therapies including counseling and medication.In addition in the last five years with the mandate of the Affordable Care Act, there has been increased emphasis on the importance of integrated behavioral health. Behavioral health and physical health are inter-related; providing behavioral health care in a primary medical care setting can reduce stigma and discrimination, be cost effective and lead to improved patient outcomes. (http://www.hrsa.gov/publichealth/clinical/BehavioralHealth/index.html) Furthermore there has been increased emphasis on the impact of opioid addiction on children and youth.  From research done here at BU we know that trainees are not adequately prepared for trauma informed care of this high risk group. (Schiff DM, Zuckerman B, Wachman EM, Bair-Merritt M.ubst Abus. 2017 Oct-Dec;38(4):414-421

This year we will have two cutting edge modules to address these issues: one specifically on Substance Use and Its Impact across the Lifespan and another on Children and Digital Media.

This conference will address many of these gaps.

 

Objectives

Through lectures and question and answer sessions, participants at the conclusion of this conference will be able to:

  • Describe the latest clinical information on developmental and behavioral issues in children and families
  • Identify such problems in their practice and work settings
  • Choose and provide appropriate treatment for such issues

 

Target Audience

Primary care physicians, pediatricians, pediatric nurse practitioners, nurses, child mental health professionals, physician assistants and family nurse practitioners.

 

Faculty Disclosure

Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) activities to disclose all relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. This information is disclosed to CME activity participants prior to the start of the educational activity. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to resolve all conflicts of interest. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and devices is being discussed.